The Week Ahead …Barracks Row Fest Photo Essay & the City Paper on Peter May

 Scenes from Saturday’s Barracks Row Fest

Outgoing Councilmember Tommy Wells with his likely successor, Democratic nominee for Ward Six CM Charles Allen

Outgoing Councilmember Tommy Wells with his likely successor, Democratic nominee for Ward Six CM Charles Allen

CM Wells with CM at Large Candidate Elissa Silverman and NBC4 News Reporter Tom Sherwood

CM Wells with CM at Large Candidate Elissa Silverman and NBC4 News Reporter Tom Sherwood

ANC6B Chair Brian Flahaven (L) and ANC6B Vice Chair Ivan Frishberg (R)

ANC6B Chair Brian Flahaven (L) and ANC6B Vice Chair Ivan Frishberg (R)

Skillz Skaters Demonstrate Prowess on Asphalt

                                            Skillz Skaters Demonstrate Prowess on Asphalt

Trapeze Artist

                                                                                Trapeze Artist

Batala Women Drummers

                                                                   Batala Women Drummers

Empowerment Through Drumming

                                                                Empowerment Through Drumming

Howl to the Chief's Main Attraction

                                                   Howl to the Chief’s Main Attraction

There's Just Something about Politicians and Babies

                                      There’s Just Something about Politicians and Babies

 The Week Ahead …Barracks Row Fest Photo Essay & the City Paper on Peter May

by Larry Janezich

The City Paper Article on Peter May

For those of who missed it, City Paper (CP) ran a lengthy front page profile of Capitol Hill resident Peter May, who it calls “the most powerful man shaping D.C.’s growth you’ve never heard of.”  May’s title is: Associate Regional Director for Lands, Planning, and Design for the National Capital Region of the National Park Service (NPS), and by virtue of that position, he sits on the DC Zoning Commission and the DC Board of Zoning Adjustment.  As a member of the Zoning Commission, he participated in the consideration of the Hine Development and – if the developers of the Frager’s site want a building more than 50 feet high there, he will be voting on that.  He is also the overseer of Capitol Hill NPS Parks:  Folger, Lincoln, Stanton, Marion(!), Potomac Avenue Metro, Seward Square, Twining Square, Maryland Avenue Triangles, the Pennsylvania Avenue Medians and 59 inner city triangles and squares (“pocket parks).

May is in charge of enforcing what many think are antiquated NPS regulations for these parks which prevent DC from developing the cultural and aesthetic amenities on public spaces which are seen everywhere in Europe.  He is described in the article by a former colleague as someone who is charged with protecting the federal and NPS interests but who takes community interests into consideration while doing so.  What the colleague does not have to say is that the federal government pays May’s salary.

Some residents have found the NPS to be unresponsive to concerns; some ANCs  have found the NPS attitude dismissive.  The CP article finds that no one wants to answer the question of why, exactly, the federal government should have a voice in micromanaging the city’s communities and neighborhoods, but that’s likely to remain the case until the District achieves true and independent home rule.  The link to the City Paper article is here:  http://bit.ly/1u0tRYD

New Capitol Hill Business

Jade Fitness, a boutique fitness facility at 1310 Pennsylvania Avenue, SE, officially opened for workouts on September 2, 1014.  Jade Fitness offers yoga, Zumba, Boot Camp classes, CorrectFit, Weekend Warrior and ABC Workout among others.  A grand opening celebration is scheduled for October. For more information, see here:  www.jadefitnessdc.com

The Week Ahead….

Tuesday, September 30

ANC 6B Executive Committee Meets at 7:00pm in the Hill Center to set the agenda for the October 14 ANC6B monthly meeting.

Tuesday, September 30

The Department of General Services will conduct the second tour of the Eastern Branch Boys and Girls Club for prospective development teams from 9:30am until 4:00 pm.  Commissioner Brian Flahaven is expected to announce a separate community tour of the site in the near future.

Thursday, October 2

ANC6B Commissioner Brian Flahaven holds a meeting on the 81 Unit Building at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, SE, project at 7:30 pm at New York Pizza (1401 Pennsylvania Ave SE). Greg Selfridge of NOVO development will be on hand to provide updates on the construction and answer questions.  (See CHC posting here:  http://bit.ly/YyyQU6

Saturday, October 4

Dead Man’s Run.  Congressional Cemetery.  6pm – 8pm

http://www.congressionalcemetery.org/dead-mans-run-2

Saturday, October 4

Blessing of Animals/Feast of St. Francis. Lincoln Park  10:00 am. Sponsored by Church of St. Monica and St. James.

2 Comments

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2 responses to “The Week Ahead …Barracks Row Fest Photo Essay & the City Paper on Peter May

  1. anon

    “if the developers of the Frager’s site want a building more than 50 feet high there, he will be voting on that”

    According to Hill Rag piece with direct quotes from Roadside:

    “The site is currently zoned CHC/C-2-A. As a matter of right, this designation permits a structure of up to 50 feet in height, with a maximum floor-to-area (FAR) ratio of 2.5 for residential and 1.5 for other permissible usages. Roadside intends to develop the Pennsylvania Avenue site as a matter of right within the existing zoning”

    Your line sounds conspiratorial. There has been nothing to suggest they’ll seek zoning variance related to height. If they seek variance, it will more likely be to limit or eliminate the amount of parking required for a prospective residential component.

    They’ll have a hell of a time going that high on top of the existing facade and remaining historically compatible. O St. Market didn’t have the CH Historic DIstrict considerations to contend with.

  2. Barbara Eck

    Peter May’s appointment has been the best friend Capitol Hill has had. Prior to his appointment we seemed to have more “Kings” fighting to “manage”our community and seldom did they live here like Mr. May does.’He is very responsive to the neighborhood as he fulfills the service he is required to provide to the city. I suggest people learn more about the restrictions on those who work very hard for our community as they deal with federal and city restrictions.